So as you saw from my blog partner Chris, I have been on the road–some for fun and some for work. But I did take the opportunity to visit and admire other gardens out there…perhaps not personal ones, but public ones for sure.

My first stop was at the Boston Public gardens--the first American public garden.  Boston, Massachusetts is know for its historical sites, but this one isn’t usually on every tourists to do list–although I think it should be one of the top five. It was tops on my list this time as I have done the Freedom trail and other hot spots.  The weather was perfect…75 degrees.  I grabbed a sandwich and fresh squeezed lemonade from the little ad hoc farmers market and set out to explore this botanical gem.

Boston Gardens Bridge *courtesy of http://www.freefoto.com

Boston Gardens Bridge *courtesy of http://www.freefoto.com

On my way to the garden, you walk along the busy streets of Boston. You hear loud honking. Watch deliveries being made. People shopping.  People participating in power lunches, etc. All the signs of a bustling city of more than 645,000 people. And then…the street ends at this oasis.  This retreat where life literally slows to a crawl.  Kids look at ducks and swans with wonder.  Couples are on blankets chatting and eating a picnic.  Individuals are reading a book or just sunbathing….the noise of the city retreats and the chorus of birds swell. And this is just upon entry…

Keep in mind, when we talk about American history it’s length doesn’t compare to those in Europe, Middle East or Africa for that matter…but I think a garden that has been groomed, kept and evolved for more than 200 years is defintiely something to write about.  This space was first created in 1837. Right off Beacon Hill and a placed smack in the middle of the city…it is a smaller version of Central Park–but, oh, the botanical diversity. There are more than 600 different trees and 80 different plant species on this 24-acre garden.  It used to be a salt marsh and for a $100 prize, George Meacham designed it to show off bright colorful annuals and other experimental greenhouse plants.

Weeping Trees *courtesy of  http://www.freefoto.com

Weeping Trees *courtesy of http://www.freefoto.com

The most prominent feature for me is the weeping trees along the pond in the center of the garden. And that is where you will find the famous Swan Boats. Owned and operated for more than 100 years, these majestic boats will take you on a water tour of the park for $3.  Not a long ride but a peaceful one and one that offers a different perspective.

Swan Boats @ Boston Public Garden *courtesy of http://www.freefoto.com

Swan Boats @ Boston Public Garden *courtesy of http://www.freefoto.com

This piece of history was a definite inspiration to me…a visit that helps me understand why I love to garden.  It is part of my heritage and it is a much needed retreat from the chaotic life in the city.

Happy gardening…or visiting gardens!

melissa

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